Bad Apple Bullies

Bad Apple school principals and departmental officers bully classroom teachers into ill health and out of work.

Tasmanian students rank 37th in the PISA reading results.

Australian students rank 17th on the Program for International Student Assessment (PISA) reading league table.

If the reading results of Tasmanian students were taken in isolation, they would rank 37th.

 

 The class divide is very real, Lauren Martyn-Jones, PP. 68-69, The Courier-Mail, 11 December 2016.

Tasmanian principal : children from dysfunctional homes are arriving at school with mental health issues.

A Tasmanian principal says that schools are struggling to cope with students scarred by dysfunctional homes.

"We are seeing more children arrive with mental health issues like anxiety, ODD (oppositional defiant disorder) and conduct disorder and behaviours that result from the circumstances that are in their homes, such as domestic violence and or drug/alcohol abuse, and it affects how they cope at school," she said.

(Australian Education Union report to the Senate inquiry into students with a disability)

 

Mum's drinking behind disabled pupil spike, Natasha Bita, P. 5, The Australian, 9 September 2015

Tasmania has a 'sick culture' of education.

Tasmania has the highest unemployment rate in Australia.

Year 12 retention rates in Tasmania are 67 per cent, behind the national average in the mid-1970's.

Leading economist Saul Eslake tells a story of a culture in stasis, stuck in the belief that children will be lost to families if they get an education and move to the mainland to work.  

On all social indicators Tasmanians are the poorest people in Australia.

 

Liberal Will Hodgman was elected Premier of Tasmania in March 2014 after 16 years of Labor-Green governments.

Hodgman puts the problem down to a "sick culture" of education.

The government-backed school system does not offer years 11 and 12 as a matter of course.

Students who want to move past Year 10 must move to one of a handful of colleges scattered around Tasmania. 

This means leaving home and added cost.

 

 

Crunch time for apple isle in doldrums, Rick Morton, P.17, The Weekend Australian, 16-17 August 2014

Tasmania is a place full of "dregs, bogans and third-generational morons".

Respected Australian arts patron Leo Schofield was artistic director of the Hobart Baroque Festival.

He has recently slammed Tasmania as a place full of "dregs, bogans and third-generational morons".

 

State turns classy, Phil Brown, P. 17, The Courier-Mail, 7 April 2015

Half of the voters in Tasmania are unable to process the  information in newspapers.

Tasmania has the lowest Years 11 and 12 retention rates in Australia.

Tasmanian literacy rates are consistently assessed as being below the national average.

Half of the population of Tasmania has been classified as being functionally illiterate, meaning they have insufficient skills to process the information from newspapers or fill out job applications.

But they have the vote.

"Some of these people are pretty much unemployable in the modern economy. They left school too early. It doesn't matter what you do, how much you train them, they are stuffed," says a long-time senior staffer in the employment field in Burnie, Tasmania.

2011 Census data reveals that almost a quarter of the population of Tasmania live in poverty or on the cusp of poverty.

Saul Eslake, a respected economist working for Bank of America Merrill Lynch, grew up on the northwest coast of Tasmania.

Eslake says school retention rates in Tasmania are appalling - "the only place it is worse is in remote Aboriginal communities".

Traditionally, most high schools in Tasmania only went to Year 10.

Students who wanted to complete Year 12 went to centralised colleges.

It meant most students simply dropped out.

"The real question everyone in government should be seeking to answer is this, " says the Reverend Tim Hayman, a Baptist minister in Burnie, "How is it that young people can leave school and not have the required numeracy and literacy skills to get a job in Bunnings?"

Down and Out, Earn or Learn, work for the dole ... but in Tasmania's unemployment hotspot, what hope is there for young people like Josh Smith? In Burnie, Greg Bearup, PP.10-14, The Weekend Australian, 16-17 August, 2014

Half of all Tasmanians are functionally illiterate - and more than half are innumerate.

Tasmania spends a greater proportion of its budget on schools than any other jurisdiction.

 

But half of all Tasmanians aged 15 to 74 are functionally illiterate.

And more than half of all Tasmanians aged 15 to 74 are functionally innumerate.

 

These voters don't have the skills needed to get by in the modern world, like filling out forms or reading instructions on a prescription.

 

Editor's note : You have to wonder if democracy is really supposed to work like this - people who are unable to read deciding how Australia should be run.

 

Illiteracy leads to recession, Kathleen Noonan, Last Word, P.32, The Courier-Mail, 5 October 2012.

260 Tasmanian public school students were suspended during 2012 for physically assaulting or harassing their teachers.

260 Tasmanian public school students from kindergarten to Year 10 have been suspended for physically assaulting or harassing a teacher during 2012.

This represents 0.4 per cent of the student population of about 53,000.

 

"The union has been contacted by teachers fairly regularly," Australian Education Union Tasmanian president Terry Polglase said.

 

Teacher abuse cases hit 260, Matt Smith, The Mercury, 18 October 2012 :   http://www.themercury.com.au/article/2012/10/18/364033_tasmania-news.html

53 Tasmanian public school students were suspended during 2012 as a result of using or possessing a weapon.

An estimated 53 Tasmanian public school students from Kindergarten to Year 10 were suspended during 2012 as a result of using or possessing a weapon.

 

"The union has been contacted by teachers fairly regularly," Australian Education Union Tasmanian president Terry Polglase said.

 

Teacher abuse cases hit 260, Matt Smith, The Mercury, 18 October 2012 :   http://www.themercury.com.au/article/2012/10/18/364033_tasmania-news.html

 

 

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