Bad Apple Bullies

Bad Apple school principals and departmental officers bully classroom teachers into ill health and out of work.

Senior South Australian Department of Education officials bully school principals to tears.

Staff at one of South Australia's toughest schools - for youths in detention and other troubled teens - are demanding a senior Education Department official be banned from its campuses because of alleged bullying.

An organisation representing school leaders says it is one of several cases of departmental officials bullying principals into tears and to the point where they need to take leave.

A dispute over staffing levels and class sizes at the Youth Education Centre - spread across three sites, including the Adelaide Youth Training Centre for young people in custody - has escalated into an industrial stouch.

The Sunday Mail has obtained three letters from Australian Education Union state president Howard Spreadbury sent this week to senior department figures.

In one letter, Mr Spreadbury told chief executive Rick Persse the official's behaviour had "led to staff being (psychologically injured", feeling un-safe and to "fear for the wellbeing of colleagues". 

The claims included "intimidatory" and "bullying" behaviour toward the principal "so that he will accept unworkable budgets that breach the Enterprise Agreement 2016", and "negative and inappropriate comments about other leaders at the school".  

The union alleges the departmental official  tied to impose staffing changes they did not have power to implement.

The union has demanded that the departmental official do not visit Youth Education Centre sites and not manage or contact any staff.

The Sunday Mail has been told that after staff rejected the official's proposals, an abusive phone call was received by the principal, attacking him and other staff.

The principal has taken sick leave.

SA State School Leaders Association chief executive John Gregory said it was not an isolated case.

"If a principal in a school did this (to their staff) they would be up for investigation," Mr Gregory said. 

Mr Spreadbury said the leaking of his correspondence was "unhelpful" and  potentially "very, very damaging to the hopes of resolving a "difficult and sensitive situation". 

Principal 'bullied' by senior official, Tim Williams, P. 16, The Advertiser,  6 August 2017

Education standards in Australia have dropped because too many poor students have been allowed to do education degrees.

In the 70s and 80s you had to have good school results and be literate to get into an education degree at Uni. 

Standards have dropped because they let too many poor students into Uni.

This stupid mentality of everyone can go to Uni has devalued degrees and Masters and PhDs.

It is pathetic.

At least private schools can get rid of dud teachers.

In DECS they just get promoted and moved into an office tower to do very little.

Library, Reader's Comment, Students wanting to be teachers to be vetted by universities under sweeping overhaul, Miles Kemp, The Courier-Mail, 8 January 2017 

Teacher out of uni for three years : what hope do I have?

As a teacher who has been out of uni for three years, I'm yet to find anything that even slightly resembles stability.

I have approached country and metro schools with little luck in finding something secure.

I attend expensive PD courses and engage with professional networks, volunteer and participate in extra-curricular events, but at a loss.

I went through an education degree being told that there was a teacher shortage and permanent jobs would be almost guaranteed, but I know teachers who have been contracting with the South Australia Department for Education and Child Development for over 15 years without being able to get permanent roles.

If even they can't get something secure, then what hope do I have?

It is hard when you choose your profession because you have a genuine fire in your belly to help and inspire young people but there is so much competition that even finding a relief teaching job can seem impossible at times.

I know people at uni who should have graduated by now but they have been forced to stay at uni while they wait for a place to open up in a school to undertake their professional placements as there are too many students and not enough schools to support them.

Unfortunately I fear it will only get worse.

This kind of thing is contributing to the upcoming generations of teachers not even being able to dream of owning a home or settling down anywhere permanent.

It drives the genuine hard workers out of teaching because they soon learn that a life living day to day in hopes of getting asked to work for even half a day wears thin and is not sustainable.

What's worse is the detriment to the learning of young people who never know who will be teaching them because teachers come and go faster than they can blink.

 

K, Reader's Comment, Easier access to university has devalued degrees, created huge debt and made some feel like failures, Charis Chang, news.com.au , 1 August 2016

Ex-teacher : after eight years of contract work, I was sick of the uncertainty.

I finished my teaching degree in 1996.

I spent 8 years on contract.

Finally I got sick of the uncertainty and I have been working in an office for the past 10 years.

Judy G of Adelaide, Reader's Comment, Easier access to university has devalued degrees, created huge debt and made some feel like failures, Charis Chang, news.com.au , 1 August 2016

Male teacher with 30 years' experience : I would not recommend any male enter the teaching profession.

As a male teacher with over 30 years' experience who has just returned from a 615 day directed leave from a false student allegation, I would not recommend any male entering the teaching profession.

Reader's Comment,  Why we need more male teachers in SA schools, Tim Williams and Renato Castello, Sunday Mail (SA), 30 January 2016

Teacher's wife : Male teachers are unfairly subjected to false allegations.

Male teachers are unfairly subjected to false accusations.

I know from first-hand experience with my husband.

Margaret, Reader's Comment, Why we need more male teachers in SA schools, Tim Williams and Renato Castello, Sunday Mail (SA), 30 January 2016

South Australian teacher with 23 years of experience  : I'm out!

After 23 years, I'm out!

Sick of -

 * the Political Correctness,

 * the "kids are always right" attitude in South Australian state schools,

 * the time-wasting brainwashing of staff meetings and "development days"which push particular philosophies,

 * the kids sent on from primary school with a reading age of Year 4, which is somehow my responsibility to fix,

 * the "reinventing the wheel" every time some departmental bigwig gets a PhD - which is then implemented even though it is a stupid idea.

But the current crop of political principals (who have a lot in common with Colonel Cathcart) finished me.

Too much extra cr-p to deal with that interferes with getting into the classroom and teaching kids.

Paul D, Reader's Comment, Why are so many teachers fleeing the classroom? Brooke Lumsden,  news.com.au  8 October 2015

Some principals just care about their school's reputation, not the students, teachers or parents.

Some principals and assistant principals are not only poor teachers and poor administrators, but also poor leaders and have poor people skills.

Some even threaten parents with a lawsuit if they mention (without using the name of any person or any school) a negative experience.

They care about reputation, not results, and definitely not staff, students or parents.

(Including directing teachers to make students panic about NAPLAN and keeping struggling students from doing the test, instead of doing it as an indicator of the strengths and weaknesses of each student, each teacher, and each school, so the teaching methods can be improved and kids can learn better.)

There needs to be a three-strike system, otherwise governments are opening themselves up for massive class action lawsuits from the systemic bullying.

Adam of Adelaide, Why are so many teachers fleeing the classroom? Brooke Lumsden, news.com.au . 8 October 2015

Contract teacher : I've been a contract teacher for 17 years.

I've been a contract teacher for 17 years.
 
I've found it very frustrating how the Department has never allowed me to apply for positions I've acted in and excelled.
 
In the past these positions were only open to existing "Permanents", many on the edge of retirement and disenfranchised.
 
Now "young" teachers are starting to be preferenced.
 
I'd prefer that all applicants were treated equally, because at the moment the Department runs a two tier system which makes it very hard for contract teachers to achieve a permanent position despite many years of proven service.

Frustrated teacher, Reader's Comment, Burnt out teachers offered $50,000 carrot to make way for young graduates, Sheradyn Holderhead, Adelaide Now, 26 July 2012 

Bully principals have a very 'top down' approach to policies and procedures.

Some of the bullying that occurs in schools is pretty subtle.

Principals can, in my current experience, have a very top down approach to policies and procedures.

These principals do not invite feedback or input.

They belittle or sideline dissent.

Teachers then have less say in what goes on around them.

The teachers retreat, and get crushed by this over time.

This sort of Principal treats their own leadership team in almost the same way.

They do not get leaders into their team who are questioners or reflectors.

Often people they want on their team are those who are just good at 'following the leader', and telling them what they want to hear.

Bob of Adelaide, Reader's Comment, Workplace bullying an everyday occurrence in schools, say teachers, Jessica Marszalek, Herald Sun, Adelaide Now, 23 September 2012

Ex-teacher : I was bullied by a school principal. The bullying cost me my mental health and my job.

I was bullied by a principal and it lost me my mental health and my job when I was at an age when getting another job proved impossible.

Since 2001 I have only managed to get casual work despite doing retraining courses etc. (at my own expense) because I am over 55.

Ex-teacher of Adelaide, Reader's Comment, Workplace bullying an everyday occurrence in schools, say teachers, Jessica Marszalek, Herald Sun, Adelaide Now, 23 September 2012 

Ex-teacher : The best day of my life was the day I finished teaching. I thank God every day that I do not have to endure bullying and a hostile working environment any more.

My bully was my aide.

She worked when she wanted to, over-ruled any decisions I made, told me all teachers were useless and that she know more because she had been there twenty years and had seen teachers come and go.

She undermined me with students, fellow teachers and any one who would listen to her gossip and lies.

The best day of my life was the day I finished teaching.

I thank God every day that I do not have to endure bullying and a hostile working environment any more.

Janet Williams of Saskatchewan and Streaky Bay (South Australia), Reader's Comment, Workplace bullying an everyday occurrence in schools, say teachers, Jessica Marszalek, Herald Sun, Adelaide Now, 23 September 2012 

Bad principals are just moved to another school or into Flinders Street and then back to a school.

It's about time the South Australian Education Department stepped in to stop bullying from Principals against teachers.
 
Principals use their position and power to intimidate teachers and school assistant officers or anyone else below them.
 
The Education Department backs the Principals all the time and bad ones are just moved to different schools or into Flinders Street and then back to a school.
 
Teachers are always under the microscope and blamed for everything.
 
If they really are keen to reduce teacher stress and compo claims then take a close look at the root cause : Principals and the pressure and demands being placed on teachers.

John, Reader's Comment, Workplace bullying an everyday occurrence in schools, say teachers, Jessica Marszalek, Herald Sun, Adelaide Now, 23 September 2012 

Management positions in schools should be earned by teachers who have studied Management.

Until positions for Management in schools are earned by those teachers who have studied and qualified specifically in Management (especially People Management), then "bully" behaviour by school principals will continue.

At the moment, if you are in the right "network", and you can talk / write "edu-speak" - you can merrily move up the management pole.

Most of the people currently in school management positions have very poor people-skills, having only learned to manage children at Teacher's College.

They do not realise there is any difference, so they resort to "Bully" behaviour to get their own way - which, sadly, due to the power of their position, happens.

Many school principals, following current available criteria, can simply be classified as psychopaths.

Julianne of Adelaide, Comment 36 of 39, Workplace bullying an everyday occurrence in schools, say teachers, Jessica Marszalek, Herald Sun, Adelaide Now, 23 September 2012 

Teacher's friend: Bullied teachers can't perform at their best. The mental damage takes a long time to heal.

One of my best friends committed suicide from workplace bullying by a principal.

Other teacher friends have suffered a range of mental and physical damage through bullying by principals.

When the extent of this bullying finally comes out into the open, the public will see not only how much harm has been caused to teachers and school services officers, but how this has had a huge impact on the learning standards achieved by the students.

Teachers who are being bullied are not able to perform at their best.

Even after transferring to another school, the mental damage takes a long time to heal, if at all.

For the sake of education standards, for students to receive the best possible education and for the wellbeing of teachers and SSOs, bullying by principals needs to be stamped out, and the sooner the better!

Brian of Adelaide, Reader's Comment, Workplace bullying an everyday occurrence in schools, say teachers, Jessica Marszalek, Herald Sun, Adelaide Now, 23 September 2012 

South Australian teachers work in an environment that can be dangerous and hostile from all sides.

On average five South Australian teachers were assaulted each school day during 2011.

The Education Department are covering their backside on this, but so do the Principals.

Not all incidents are reported due to the lack of or no support from the Ed Dep or the Principals.

They have a tendency to blame the teacher for not doing enough.

I suggest to all who think teaching is a bed of roses go become a teacher and see how supported you are in an environment that can be dangerous and hostile from all sides.

John, Comment 16 of 62, Five teachers a day assaulted by students, Callie Watson, Adelaide Now, 16 July 2012 

Ex-teacher : I was appalled by the behaviour and the attitude of South Australian students.

I used to be a teacher here in Adelaide and then I went to the UK in 2001 and did some teaching over there.
 
I was very surprised.
 
Although I didn't teach in the tough London schools, I worked in a variety of schools and it was lovely to hear 'yes, miss' or 'excuse me, miss'.
 
The respect was still there then.
 
I came back to Adelaide and did some relief teaching for a couple of years and was appalled by the behaviour and attitude of the students.
 
I decided that my safety and levels of stress were best served by leaving teaching.
 
I do not regret it.

Lyn of Adelaide, Comment 23 of 62, Five teachers a day assaulted by students, Callie Watson, Adelaide Now, 16 July 2012 

Teacher's sister : Students' parents physically and verbally attack teachers.

My sister was a teacher and, while the students occasionally gave her abuse, the real problem was the parents of the students who would physically and verbally attack her.
 
The kids see this and hey presto they assume it is the correct behaviour.
 
My sister has since left teaching children and now teaches adults only.
 
Daniel of Adelaide, Reader's Comment, Five teachers a day assaulted by students, Callie Watson, Adelaide Now, 16 July 2012 
 

Ex-teacher : Students' parents are feral nowadays.

I got out of teaching about 30 years ago.
 
Teachers have no authority, and the students know it.
 
Parents have no authority, the so called educationalists have taken away any discipline they once had.
 
Sure, sometimes it was overused, but classes of forty or more were not unusual and the children actually respected their teachers, as did the parents.
 
Now parents are feral, what can you expect of the children?
 
Sandy Row, Reader's Comment, Five teachers a day assaulted by students, Callie Watson, Adelaide Now, 16 July 2012 

Student teacher : Even if a student is turning another student into a bloody pulp, teachers cannot touch them below the shoulders - and must ask their permission first.

As a teaching student on the verge of graduating, it is so sad to see how the school system has decayed in the past few years.
 
Children are not properly disciplined by their parents, some only because they are so tired from working full-time jobs they simply don't have the motivation to be a role model.
 
Many children start school unable even to write their own name.
 
Political correctness has allowed children who are not ready to be pushed through the system, and by the time they reach high school they still cannot structure a sentence or do their times tables.
 
Poor literacy often leads to poorer behaviour, as students will attempt to hide their academic "failure" behind bullying techniques.
 
Furthermore, teachers have less autonomy in the classroom, and even if a child asks for a hug or is turning another student into a bloody pulp, teachers cannot touch them below the shoulders and must ask their permission first.
 
If a student was injured by a teacher, no matter how "just" the cause for touching them, you can bet that teacher would be de-registered for life.
 
Disheartened of final year degree, Reader's Comment, Five teachers a day assaulted by students, Callie Watson, Adelaide Now, 16 July 2012 

South Australian teachers are sick of "feral bush-pig" parents.

It's not just the "poor white trash" misbehaving.
 
Even so-called "middle class" kids have disgusting, disrespectful behaviour.
 
Until "Parents" (what a joke!) get a back-bone and start disciplining their own children nothing will change.
 
Many of the parents of my students are more feral than their kids!
 
The government (i.e., taxpayers) needs to intervene and provide more places for behaviour units so the kids who want to learn, can, in peace.
 
Teachers are sick to death of bush-pig parents and their feral offspring.
 
Teacher Not a Social Worker of the Land of the Lost, Reader's Comment, Five teachers a day assaulted by students, Callie Watson, Adelaide Now, 16 July 2012
 

Member of family of teachers : Anyone thinking about being a teacher should seriously think about the risk and stress that goes with teaching in the South Australian public school system.

I have three family members who are teachers.
 
There is no respect for authority.
 
Feral parents with feral children are wasting so much teaching time.
 
My advice to any one thinking about being a teacher is to seriously think about the risk and stress that goes with teaching in the public school system.
 
David S.of South Australia, Reader's Comment, Five teachers a day assaulted by students, Callie Watson, Adelaide Now, 16 July 2012 
 

South Australian teachers and other public servants who complain of workplace bullying or criticise their managers are being told they are "mentally unfit" to work under Section 56 of the Public Service Act.

South Australian public servants - including teachers - who complain of bullying or criticise their managers are being labelled "mentally incapacitated" and forced to see psychiatrists.

SA's Employee Ombudsman is investigating a spike in complaints from public servants stood down - some even marched from their workplace in front of colleagues - after being told they were "mentally unfit" to work under Section 56 of the Public Service Act.

Premier Jay Weatherill, as Public Sector Minister, changed the Act in 2009, giving department chief executives the right to hire and fire staff.

Staff believed to be not performing "satisfactorily" can be ordered to undergo a psychiatric or physical evaluation to prove they are still "mentally fit" to work.

Employee Ombudsman Stephen Brennan, the Public Service Association and industry advocates, said Section 56 was being abused, especially in education, health and Housing SA departments, which had a noticeable rise in the sanctions.

Mr Brennan said the use of Section 56 "appeared to reach something of a peak in about February this year (2012)", with 15 cases presented to his office.

"It was being used in ways it was not intended and the result is very damaging to the individuals and their families and what happens is many end up on WorkCover," he said.

 

Industrial psychologist Chris Hamilton said he had assessed many people on Section 56 sanctions who "demonstrated mental integrity and sanity".

"The way in which it appears to have been used ... appears to be an extraordinary misuse of the section, if not abuse ... tantamount to workplace bullying," he said.

 

Workplace consultant and former employee ombudsman Gary Collis, who has also helped people given Section 56 sanctions, said he had seen "sufficient evidence there are many employees who have had that section used against them for the wrong reasons".

"What a great tool Section 56 is for bullying - if you don't like someone or someone starts questioning your motive, you can just slap a Section 56 and then you don't have to worry about that person any more," Mr Collis said.

 

PSA chief industrial officer Peter Christopher said Section 56 matters took a "horrendous" amount of time to resolve, employees were unaware of appeal rights and psychiatrists were often provided with minimal "evidence" for an evaluation.

Public servants forced to see shrinks, Alice Monfries, The Sunday Mail (SA), Adelaide Now, 19 May 2012 

Hamilton Secondary College, SA : 56-year-old teacher punched several times.

On Tuesday 29 November 2011, a 56-year-old Hamilton Secondary College teacher asked a student from another school to leave the school grounds.
 
The 16-year-old male student  punched the Hamilton Secondary College teacher several times.

The teacher was taken by ambulance to Flinders Medical Centre where he was treated for a burst blood vessel in his eye and cuts to his left cheek.

Second teacher attack within a week, Education Writer Emily Watkins, Sunday Mail (SA), 3 December 2011

"I gave up my career as a teacher in the UK for a false promise of a teaching job in South Australia."

"As a teacher brought over from the UK to 'fill the teaching gap' in South Australia (WHAT GAP?), because I have 11 years experience I can't even apply for the jobs vacated by teachers who take an early retirement package.
 
The state of South Australian education is appalling.
 
Heads should fall in DECS and the Education Ministry.
 
I gave up my job, my career in the UK for a false promise - what are they doing for us?
Freud's Cane of Brighton, Reader's Comment 7 of 7,  Teachers line up to fill exit plan gap, Education Reporter Sheradyn Holderhead, The Advertiser, 1 July 2011 

South Australian Education Department Head Office bureaucrats allegedly offered public sector separation packages in excess of $200,000.

The biggest problem in the South Australian education sector is the bloated head office.
 
Many thousands of public servants are working in the Flinders Street head office of the Education Department on salaries far in excess of the most experienced classroom teacher.
 
Even the approach taken to reduce staff numbers in schools versus head office is distorted.
 
South Australian teachers have been offered individual separation packages to a maximum of $50,000.
 
But bureaucrats in the Education Department have been offered public sector separation packages which in some cases have exceeded $200,000.
 
Lucy of Mile End, Reader's Comment 1 of 7, Teachers line up to fill exit plan gap, Education Reporter Sheradyn Holderhead, The Advertiser, 1 July 2011 

South Australian teacher's mother : my son has been working his backside off, doing the right thing, but he still cannot get a permanent position. He struggles from one week to the next.

Teaching in South Australia is an absolute joke and out of control.
 
I have to be careful what I say, but my son is 27 years old and, from what I have been told, an outstanding teacher of young kids.
 
He cannot get a full time position and lives from term to term and year to year.
 
He has been to the country, interstate and has done the tough classes in high risk: high school card schools and yet cannot get a permanent position.
 
The Government and the Teachers Union should be ashamed of this.
 
I don't know of how many stories I read on how we need more teachers.
 
What a lot of rot.
 
Do not run any more Uni Courses until the positions are filled.
 
Many professions now do this; but gee then the Uni's would be out of business.
 
Well bad luck.
 
There is talk of another new scheme where graduates would get the full time jobs - so what happens to those like my son who has been working his backside off, doing the right things and still cannot get a permanent position?
 
He cannot apply for a housing loan and struggles from one week to the next, not knowing what next year will bring.
 
He has to wait until well into a new year before he even knows if he has a job.
 
Get this right South Australia.
  • Christine of Adelaide, Reader's Comment 7 of 18, 50 teachers looking for a classroom, Education Reporter Sheradyn Holderhead, The Advertiser, 8 April 2011 

South Australian teacher's mother : how long will it take for my daughter to get a permanent teaching position?

My daughter lives for teaching, went to the country first out, then taught overseas in difficult multi-cultural schools, and is back with a wealth of experience and passion for her profession, but is existing on term-by-term contracts or if she does not get another contract, TRT work.
 
This has long repercussions for her life plans - getting a housing loan etc.
 
For years she has been told that with all the imminent retirements, she WILL get a position.
 
But how long will this actually take?
  • Jennifer from Glandore, SA, Reader's Comment 16 of 18, 50 teachers looking for a classroom, Education Reporter Sheradyn Holderhead, The Advertiser, 8 April 2011

Teacher's husband of Adelaide : people who think teachers have an easy working life should spend more time having furniture thrown at them.

I am not surprised that so many teachers want to leave teaching.
 
Children are becoming increasingly abusive and violent towards teachers, to the point where the police have to be called in daily to some schools - and these are not necessarily the worst schools either.
 
The subjective marking system (A-E) leaves teachers wide open to criticism from parents.
 
Management support is poor.
 
It is practically impossible for young teachers to secure a permanent position; term-long and year-long contracts are the norm.
 
Higher qualifications are actually a hindrance to employability due to the higher pay rates that they attract.
 
Yes, the teachers get more holidays, but they are also expected to participate in a broad range of after-school functions for which they are not paid.
 
They are also expected to teach subjects for which they have no qualifications.
 
Those who think teachers have an easy working life should spend more time having furniture thrown at them and trying to prevent high-school children from defecating in rubbish bins before they pass judgement.
  • Teacher's husband of Adelaide, Reader's Comment 27 of 60, Why our teachers want to leave, Martina Simos, The Advertiser, 5 April 2011 

Adelaide ex-teacher : I left teaching and I have never looked back.

I left teaching and have never looked back - from a contract teaching job to permanent position in the public service, a higher wage, no unpaid overtime (as with teaching .. lesson planning, marking, report writing, phoning parents after hours).
 
Who would want to be a teacher these days?
 
The job involves having to bring up other people's kids, teach them manners, and it's not a respected position in our society.
  • Ex teacher of Adelaide, Reader's Comment 54 of 60, Why our teachers want to leave, Martina Simos, The Advertiser, 5 April 2011 

Why do so many South Australian teachers try to leave the state?

The South Australian Department of Education and Children's Services (DECS) is running a campaign designed to attract more switched-on, high-earning-potential young people to the profession.

Why?

Over the past eight years, 2119 South Australian teachers have sought interstate registration.

So why do so many teachers leave the state?

  • broken windows repaired with electrical tape,
  • dodgy desks,
  • students learning in transportable classrooms
  • 29 students in a class
  • teachers having to turn off 30-year-old air-conditioners so their students can hear them
- because DECS has slashed school maintenance budgets.
  • teachers have to battle with Shared Services (payroll) for payment for a day of relief teaching carried out months before which, when paid, is at the wrong rate, leading to more unanswered phone calls and emails.
  • the Government has sold off all teacher accommodation within 100 kilometres of Adelaide.
  • the Government delays every reform with surveys, feedback sessions and reviews.
  • there is a feeling at the chalk-face that changes, even positive reforms, are rushed.
  • the system seems to deliberately encourage the drift to private education - and thus save the state even more money.

Students coming up through teaching courses in SA see the writing on the wall; they judge what they're really in for are short-term contracts, an (at best) indifferent department, and a constant struggle for wage parity.

So they leave.

  • What those teacher ads don't tell you, Stephen Orr, an Adelaide-based educationalist and author, The Advertiser, 5 April 2011 

South Australia : bullied teacher sues the State of South Australia, represents himself in court, and wins $370 000 damages.

Francis Thomas McDonald, an overworked and harassed former schoolteacher, has been awarded about $370,000 damages after successfully suing the state of South Australia.

Mr McDonald claimed he was harassed, victimised and bullied as a computer teacher at Brighton Secondary School.

In 2001 he went on sick leave.

Mr McDonald, 60, had a keen interest in computing.

Mr McDonald had voluntarily helped set up and maintain school computer networks during his time at Brighton Secondary School.

Much of his work fell outside the boundaries of his contract as a teacher.

Mr McDonald represented himself during the trial.

Mr McDonald alleged that he was victimised and bullied.

The judge ruled in favour of Mr McDonald's claims his treatment by the department left him with no option but to resign.

"Mr McDonald was justified in taking the action that he did," Justice Anderson said.

 

Justice Anderson awarded Mr McDonald $369,100 in damages for loss of past and future earnings as well as loss of reputation and dignity.

Bullied teacher wins $370,000 payout, Andrew Dowdell, Court Reporter, The Advertiser, 25 May 2008

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